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Full text of "1st to 10th Annual Reports of the Greylock Commission. Reports (1902-1910)"

ii 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



No. 67. 



FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



or THI 



Greylock Commission. 



J 

January, 1902. 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
' 18 Post Office Square. 

1902. 

' i 







i 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



No. 67. 



FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



47, 



Greylock . Commission, 



January, 1902 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1902. 



A 

Commanfotaltlj of ||tassacljusjetts 



Eeport of the Geeylock Cosimission. 



This commission was appointed in June, 1898. The sub- 
scription of funds was not completed, and the property of the 
Greylock Park Association w^as not secured till the close of 
1899. In 1899, 3,3241 acres were bought, the State furnish- 
ing $25,000. To this is to be added 400 acres secured from 
the Greylock Park Association. 

The county of Berkshire, through its commissioners, appro- 
priated $1,500 for mnning expenses in the year 1900, and 
the same sum for the year 1901. These expenses exceeded 
somewhat $1,500 the first year, and during the year 1901 
have fallen below $1,500. 

Sum subscribed, |1,965 18 

Paid Greylock Park Association, . f 1,378 00 
Paid excess on last land purchase, . 454 06 
Paid excess in running expenses, . 59 84 

Money on hand, .... 73 28 

fl,965 18 

The foregoing statement is a correct exhibit of the expendi- 
tures of the Greylock Commission up to November, 1901. 



JOHN BASCOM. 
A. B. MOLE. 

FRANCIS W. ROCKWELL. 



KEPOKT OF THE GREYLOCK COMMISSIOJST. 



The reservation now contains 6,844 acres ; some 1,200 or 
1,300 acres more are required to complete it, as at present 
laid out. The last appropriation of $14,000 enabled us to 
add 1,384 acres. The county has greatly improved, during 
the past year, the road leading to the summit from the south. 
The purposes for which the reservation was made gain more 
perfect accomplishment each year. 

Detailed Items of Expenditures in Land Purchases from Fund of 



$14,000. 

1004. 

Dec. 28. J. H. Emigh, civil engineer, f 292 80 

1005. 

Jan. 19. Joseph Bissaillon, 35 acres, 300 00 

Jan. 24. A. W. Saflford, register deeds, 1 79 

Feb. 1. J. H. Emigh, civil engineer, 282 29 

Feb. 14. Warren B. Dean, 64 acres, 1,000 00 

Mar. 15. H. J. Arnold, 8 acres, 50 00 

Mar. 15. A. W. Saflford, register deeds, 1 62 

Mar 21. Leonard A Rider, 971 acres, 1,000 00 

Mar. 21. A. W. Saflford, register deeds, 1 64 

Apr. 27. Paul and Selma Scholz, 200 acres, .... 2,025 00 

Apr. 27. Andrews Hall, one-half 75 acres, . . . . 375 00 

Apr. 27. South Adams Savings Bank, one-half 76 acres, . 375 00 

Apr. 27. A. W. Saflford, register deeds, 6 74 

Apr. 29. Richmond Iron Company, 207 acres, . . . 2,000 00 

Apr. 29. Richmond Iron Company, 75 acres, . . . . 900 00 

Apr 29. A. W. Saflford, register deeds, 3 24 

May 4. J. H. Emigh, civil engineer, 162 84 

May 8. Clarence M Smith, attorney, 71 64 

May 24. A. W. Saflford, register deeds, 2 39 



Amount carried forward, 



4 



GREIXOCK COMmSSION. 



[Jan. 



Amount brought forward, f 8,8o0 99 

1893. 

May 24. R. B. Curamings, 346 acres (including right of 

way, ^100) 1,825 00 

Apr. 24. A. W. Safford, register deeds, 4 51 

May 24. Kverett and Wm. Andrews, 10 acres, . . . 325 00 

July 6. A. W. Safford, register deeds 2 39 

$11,007 89 

May 5. Reserved for L. L. Brown estate for two lots taken 
by right of eminent domain, not yet paid for by 
the State : — 

Aldrich lot, 140 acres, . . . SI, 400 00 
Fisk lot, 128 acres, . . . . 896 00 

2,296 00 



Total, §13,303 89 

Lands acquired from the $14,000 Appropeiatiox. 

The lands obtained with the Sl-ijOOO appropriation, save 
two small parcels, one of 10 and one of 30 acres, are on 
the southwest, south and southeast of tlie reservation as 
heretofore acquired. Previous to these purchases the south- 
erly line of the reservation only extended to the summit of 
the westerly of the two peaks as seen from central and south- 
ern Berkshire, called Saddle Ball. Land has been added on 
the west, south and east of that peak. It is well wooded, 
and thus the forest will be preserved. The southerly^ line 
of the reservation, as now laid out, is on the northerly line 
of the town of Cheshire, except that the Follett lot extends 
a short distance into Cheshire. 

The work involved in obtaining these lands has been some- 
what of a task, and has taken time, for the reason that the 
northerly line of the town of Cheshire had to be determined 
first; the lands surveyed, that the entire acreage needed 
could be determined ; the process of eminent domain used 
in part; and the boundaries, in most cases, had to be ad- 
justed between adjoining owners. This work was begun in 
190-4, and continued until the snow came. Xegotiations 
had to be made with the owners, deeds drawn and titles 
looked into, before the lands were finally acquired. Sur- 
veying, negotiations, title searching, taking of lands by 
eminent domain, settling the matter of acreage, boundary 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 67. 



5 



lines, and preparing proper deeds, kept the commission 
quite busy. The detail Avork has been great, owing to the 
location of the lands and the uncertainty of holdings, etc. 

This addition to the reservation is especially agreeable to 
the residents of central and southern Berkshire, for, aside 
from brinffinof the lands further south, the woods on the 
heights, as seen from the lakes and hills at the south, will 
thus be preserved in all the views of the mountain from that 
locality. It was to obtain and preserve these forests that 
the appropriation was made by the State. 

The work was accomplished just in time, as shown by the 
m fact that timber has just been cut from the slopes southerly 
of the new line established for the reservation. The indus- 
tries at Adams and Cheshire had need of the forest, — in- 
deed, some of the timber had already been bargained for, 
and some was actually cut and all threatened, when the 
State happily intervened. 

In addition to the preservation of the forest, these pur- 
chases will pave the way for making easier the trail used by 
mountain climbers from Adams and Cheshire harbor, and 
will provide a way for the much-needed carriage drive on 
the easterly side of the mountain. 

In connection with these purchases certain rights of way 
have been secured, which, Avhen properly worked, will 
greatly aid the approaches to the reservation, — for exam- 
ple, a right of way leading down to the highway near the 
Scholz house ; this will benefit the people who use the trol- 
ley roads. Further down toward Cheshire harbor another 
right of way leads from the highway to the Bassett Brook 
in the line of " the old stage road," thus giving an approach 
to the southeasterly part of the reservation. That part of 
the way from Cheshire up past "Jones Nose," which ran 
through the Cummings farm, which was discontinued as a 
public way a few years since, will now be secured to the 
public by a right of way. A right of way will run from 
the last-named right of way northeasterly to Kitchen Brook, 
on the north line of Cheshire, making it possible to lay a trail 
or drive along the northerly line of Cheshire easterly to the 
FoUett lot, owned by the Commonwealth, and thence north- 



6 



GREYLOCK COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



crly through that lot to a wood road connecting, on the 
easterly side of the mountain, with the trail from Cheshire 
harbor and Adams up the mountain. 

In future years, when proper roads are built, people from 
the south will be able to drive up the Avest side of the moun- 
tain and down the east side. When these roads are built, 
people from North Adams can drive up the mountain on the 
north side and drive down towards Adams and then back 
to Nortli Adams on a far better grade. A right of way has 
been obtained over the Cummings farm, about half a mile, 
over the way now called ' ' the temporary road," leading from 
Lane8])orough to the summit. This has been heretofore 
used by Pittsfield, Lanesborough and Williamstown people, 
but the right to its use, etc., has now been given by deed. 
There should be a right obtained from that right southerly 
to the bridge below, about one mile, or a county road might 
be laid there. A right of way has been obtained from the 
south line of the extended reservation southerly to the foot 
of Round's rock, on the east side of that cliff. This right 
may in time be extended down over the ridge, southerly, to 
the Xorthup road in Lanesborough. 

The commission met with great kindness and courtesy in 
their dealings with the owners of the lands acquired, and, 
although the questions Avhich arose were often perplexing, all 
took a friendly interest in the general plan and purpose of 
the Grey lock State Reservation. 

What the People of the County of Beekshire have 

DONE AND CONTRIBUTED TOWARD THE GrEYLOOK StATE 

Reservation. 

Under the original act three commissioners were appointed 
from Berkshire County. They were Prof. John Bascom of 
Williamstown, for six years ; Hon. Francis W. Rockwell of 
Pittsfield, for four years ; Mr. Alfred B. Mole of Adams, 
for two years. 

In 1900 Mr. Mole was reappointed for six years. In 1902 
Mr. Rockwell was reappointed for six years. Mr. Mole 
resigned, having removed to Canada ; and Mr. Edward S. 
Wilkinson of North Adams was appointed to fill the unex- 



190(1.] PUBLIC DOCrMEXT — Xo. 67. 



pired term. On the death of Mr. Wilkinson, Mr. William 
H. Sperry was appointed to fill the unexpired term, ending 
June, 1906. 

The commission, January, 1906, consists of Prof. John 
Bascom, Hon. Francis W. Rockwell and Mr. William H. 
Sperry. These commissioners have served without compen- 
sation and with no charge for personal expenses. 

A fund of $1,965.18 was raised by subscription, in order 
to complete the free gift of the 400 acres on the summit 
from the old Greylock Park Association, and for other pur- 
poses, a free gift of the 400 acres being a condition prece- 
dent to the granting of the original appropriation from the 
State. Contributions were made by Pittsiield people toward 
opening a temporary road from the south to the summit, 
beginning even before the^ original appropriation was made 
from the State. These subscriptions aggreg-ated but a few 
hundred dollars, but these amounts were supplemented by a 
great deal of volunteer work by a few interested people. 

This temporary rough mountain road made the work of 
the county coimiiissioners in building a permanent road far 
easier. The county of Berkshire grants an annual appro- 
priation of $1,500 for the care and maintenance of the res- 
ervation. From this fund the roads have been cared for, 
trails cut out and a superintendent of the reservation kept ; 
a house has been built for the superintendent and his family. 

The county commissioners have already expended about 
$16,500 on the road leading southerly from the summit. 

Miss Susan A. Chui'chill of Pittsfield, in November, 1905, 
gave 1914 acres to square out the reservation on the south- 
east. 

JOHN BASCOM, 
FRANCIS W. ROCKWELL, 
WILLIAM H. SPERRY, 

Commissioners. 



rL>ijLil\^ JL/I^l^ L jIxjJN .... 


\n fi7 


STATE HQU^g: ^ ■ 





SECOiSTD AXXUAL EEPOET 



Greylock Commission. 



•JUXE, 1903. 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 
1903. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



Xo. 67. 



SECOND ANNUAX EEPOET 



Greylock Commission. 



June, iocs 



9» 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & roriER PRDs'TIXG CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1903. 



• (CI 



THE 



State "Board oe' t^u^LidAtioi?.* * 



A 



Commonfajealt^ of Massachusetts. 



Eeport of the Gretlock Commission. 



To Hon. Wm. M. Olin, Secretary of State. 

The commission have expended during the last year the 
$20,000 granted in 1902 in the purchase of 1,732 acres, 
mostly forest and very essential in connection with the reser- 
vation. We have reached the outside bounds of the reserva- 
tion at many points, and have good command of the most 
interesting features. Prices have been somewhat higher than 
in previous purchases. The reservation now contains about 
5,500 acres. VTe hope for an appropriation another winter 
that will enable us to complete it. We are just commencing a 
survey of outside boundaries. We regard the work of the 
year as successful. 

By the close of 1901 the first appropriation of $25,000 was 
expended, as previously reported. 

A second appropriation was made in 1902 of $20,000, and 
expended during the year in the purchase of 1,732 acres of 
land and in incidental expenses of recording deeds. 

The purchases are as follows : — 



WiLLiAMSTOWN, MASS., June, 1903. 



1902. 



Aug. 14. 

Aug. 8. 

Aug. 25. 

Aug. 27. 

Oct. 3. 

Nov. 17. 

Nov. 19. 

Nov. 29. 

Dec. 6. 

Dec. 22. 

Dec. 27. 



H. C. Benton, 25 acres, . 
John E. Lamb, 45 acres, 
L. B. Jenks, 31 acres, . 
A. B. Roys, 120 acres, . 
S. Proctor Thayer, 65 acres, . 
Lewis Perkins, 120 acres, 
George L. Follett, 230 acres, 
Nathan Goodell, 300 acres, . 
S. Proctor Thayer, 125 acres. 
City of North Adams, 50 acres, 
Charles B. Hubbell, 75 acres, 



$200 00 
200 00 
314 00 
600 00 
1,250 00 
3,009 83 
890 00 
2,700 00 
2,000 00 
304 20 
1,300 00 



1003. 



Jan. 31. 
March 2. 
March 4. 



S. H. Burbank, 75 acres, 

S. Bacon, 427 acres, 

The Paul family, 44 acres. 



2,000 00 
4,270 00 
939 00 



4 



GREYLOCK COMMISSION. [June, 1903. 



In 1902 there was received $1,500 for current expenses from 
the county of Berkyhire. It was expended on the salary of the 
superintendent, on his dwelling and on roads. 

JOHN BASCOM, Williamstown, 

Chairman. 

FRANCIS W. ROCKWELL, Pittsfield, 
WILLIAM H. SPERRY, North Adams, 

Commissioners. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



No. 67. 



THIED ANNUAL EEPOET 



OF THE 



Greylock Commission. 



JANUAEY, 1904. 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1904. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



No. 07. 



THIED ANNUAL EEPORT 



Greylock Commission, 



A 



JANUARY, 1904. 





BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1904. 



AppiuirBiv BY 
.^.Xuv.^J^T^ fiQ^^p OF Publication. 



7//M3 



REPORT OF THE GREYLOCK COMMISSIO^^. 



The period covered by this report extends from Jan. 1, 1903, 
to Jan. 1, 1904. 

The Greylock Commission now consists of John Bascom 
(Williamstown), Francis W, Rockwell (Pittstield) and AV. H. 
Sperry (North Adams). 

The land purchased during the present year has been .546 
acres : the whole amount of land now belongincr to the reser- 
vation is 5,460 acres. The two appropriations made by the 
State, of $25,000 and $20,000, are now exhausted. The 546 
acres purchased during the present year cost ST, 209. 

We liave received ti'om the county for current expenses 
$1,500. This has been expended on roads and on the build- 
ings at the summit. One new trail has been 6j>«|ied in the 
direction of Adams. There are now two roads to the summit, 
and thi-ee trails. 

The number of visitors to the summit during the year has 
been unusually large, approaching 10,000. 

We are greatly in need of better accommodations. The 
completion of the reservation will require the purchase of 
some 2,000 acres more. 

JOHN BASCOM, 

Chairman. 

WiLLIAMSTOWX. MaSS. 



kjBLIC DOCUMENT 



No. 67. 



I 



FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 



CtReylock Commission 




JANUARY, 1905. 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1905. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



No. G7. 



FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Greylock Commission 



January, i905. 



•« 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1905. 



Appkoved by 
The State Board of Publication. 




A 



REPORT OF THE GREYLOCK COMMISSION. 



The reservation now embraces 5,460 acres, and we are just 
about to add 30 acres. The Legislature last spring granted 
the reservation $14,000. The land we wished to purchase lay 
in one body in an extreme portion of the range. The owner- 
ship and boundaries were uncertain, and there seemed to be 
a disposition to put up prices. Under these circumstances 
it was necessary to do considerable preliminary work. This 
is now about finished and we hope shortly to add a thousand 
or more acres. 

The number of visitors has been large during the year. 

The chief work accomplished has been the laying out and 
partially completing a road toward Pittstield with a better 
grade. 

JOHN BASCOM, 
FRANCIS W. ROCKWELL, 
WM. H. SPERRY, 

Commissioners. 

William STOWN, Mass., Dec. 21, 1904. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT .... .... No. 67. 

FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



G KEYLOCK Commission, 



January, 1906. 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1906. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



No. 67. 



FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

t 

G KEYLOCK Commission. 



JANUARY, 1906. 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1906. 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 




PUBLIC DOC^it&ift^-.'A . . .... Xo. 67 

= ^ JAN ? 1 19Q7 

state: house r^Q-TOTM' 

SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Greylock Commission, 



January, i90" 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1907. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



No. 67. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



KEYLOCK COMMISSIO^T. 



January, ioot. 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Sqcake. 
1907. 



Approved BY^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

•TnVlSf^B'BvAilb OF PUBLIGATION 



A 



REPORT OF THE GREYLOCK C0:NB1ISSI0X. 



Chapter 448 of the Acts of 1906 appropriated $30,000 for 
enlarging the Greylock State Reservation, the commission 
being authorized to expend the same for the pui-pose of ac- 
quiring, by pui'chase or otherwise, lands deemed necessary 
or advisable to acquire during the three years 1906—08. 
The sum of $10,000 was available for the year 1906. 

The commission has piu'chased two tracts of land, one ot 
100.3 acres, known as *'the Fitchburg Railroad lot," on 
Mount Prospect, for $1,003; and one of 10 acres, adjoin- 
ing, overlooking Williamstown, which is well wooded and 
accessible. These are desirable acquisitions to the forest. 

The commission has also agreed to purchase * • the Walden 
lots," so called, one of 249 acres, in Williamstown, and one 
of 196 acres, in North Adams, for the sum of $6,000 ; but 
the commission are advised that it is desirable, in order to 
secure a good title, — the descriptions and the old deeds be- 
ing defective. — to take the land first by eminent domain, 
and then by a supplementary deed. 

The commission has also in view certain other lots, where 
it will be necessary to make surveys to determine the exact 
holdings of the several owners, and the surveys will be made 
next season. 

The Berkshire County conunissioners, by chapter 419 of 
the Acts of 1906. were authorized to construct and maintain, 
at the expense of the county of Berkshire, a public wa}' 
leading from the south and into the reservation as far as 
Mitchell Brook. They have decided to use as a part of the 
way the present road for about 400 feet between Mitchell 
Brook and the site of ''the old Ash Fort." From the sit^ 



4 



GREYLOCK COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



of the old fort to the southerly terminus of this proposed 
road is about r>\i miles, % of a mile of which is on the res- 
ervation proper, and about 1^4 niiles over a right of way 
owned l)y the Commonwealth over the Cummings farm to 
the foot of "Hound's Rock." The county commissioners 
have already caused this road to be laid out, and have made 
surveys of the way, etc. The portion on the reservation 
proper has been cleared so that it can be graded next spring. 
This work has been done by Mr. George A. Bauer, the man 
in charge of the reservation. 

The commission has caused a survey and location to be 
made of one of the rights of way on the Cummings farm, to 
connect the town road running up from Cheshire with the 
new road to be built by the county, which, when worked, 
will benefit the Cheshire people. 

Crushed stone has been placed in muddy places on the 
road from the summit to North Adams, which will greatly 
improve that road. Each spring and fall the roads are gone 
over to see that they are repaired and properly protected. 
There is already a very good mountain road from the sum- 
mit southerly to the site of "the old Ash Fort," about 31^4 
miles, although it may be widened and improved in future 
years; and this, in connection with the new county w^ay 
above referred to, soon to be constructed, will furnish as 
easy an access to the mountain as can be expected from 
central and southern Berkshire. 

The commission is having printed two small pamphlets : 
one by Prof. T. Nelson Dale, on " The Geological History 
of Mount Grejdock ; " and another by Prof. John Bascom, 
the chairman of the commission, being a general paper on 

The Grejdock State Reservation." 

A road, about 1% miles in length, leading from the main 
road from the south to the summit, has been agreed upon 
by the commission, which will give access to " the Camping 
Ground," and thence to Stony Ledge, where the best view 
of " the Hopper " may be obtained. This road, it is hoped, 
may be begun next season. 

The 3"ear has seen many tourists upon the mountain from 
all parts of the world. The New England Telephone and 
Telegraph Company, by an arrangement with the commis- 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 67. 5 

sion, has connected the mountain with their Adams ex- 
change, adding gi-eatlv to the protection of the reservation 
in case of fire, as it gives a speedy way of calling out the fire 
wardens of the surrounding towns. It is very convenient, 
and is much appreciated by visitors to the mountain. The 
line runs about 3 ^'2 miles up the hill from Adams, and 
through a pipe, 2,800 feet in length, up the steep incline on 
the east face of the mountain. 

A new trail has been proposed and partially blazed and 
cut through, running from "the Xorth Adams Road " to- 
ward AVilliamstown, which, when completed, will shorten 
the distance about 2 miles from Williamstown to the sum- 
mit. AVork has been done on all other trails, improving 
them greatly. 

The little cottage has been painted. Openings have been 
cut on the roads, where views can be had without the sacri- 
fice of trees and timber. A small bridge has been built over 
^ Peeks Brook on the Adams and Cheshire harbor trail. 

There are quite a number of contemplated improvements 
in the line of roads and beautifying the summit, which will 
be entered upon as future appropriations are received from 
the county. 

JOHN BASCOM. 
FRANCIS ^y. ROCKWELL. 
WILLIAM H. SPERRY. 



Public Documitf^UBHmOFMASSO'JSETrS, no. 67 

MAHb 19Q8 = 
MtAfk HQnm MimOH. 

SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Greylock Commission. 



January,' 1908. 




BOSTON: 

WEIGHT & POTTEE PELN'TING CO., STATE PEINTEES, 
18 Post Office Squabb. 
1908. 



Public Document 



No. 67 



SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Greylock Commission 



A 



January, loos. 




BOSTON: 

WEIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1908. 



AlPROVED BY 

The State Board of Publication. 



7/1/1/13 

A 



KEPORT OF THE GEEYLOCK RESERVA- 
TIOTsT COMMISSIOJSr. 



The work on the reservation for the year 1907 has been 
quite satisfactory. The county appropriated $1,500 for the 
care and maintenance. That sum has been expended for the 
salary of a superintendent, for the building and repair of 
roads, trimming out the bru^h on some portion of the road- 
side, and for the general care of the reservation. Vouchers 
for all expenditures have been filed with the county commis- 
sioners. 

In April the superintendent visited the towns around the 
reservation, interviewing the fire wardens, and calling upon 
the selectmen and upon the city authorities of ITorth Adams, 
so that all might be ready to respond promptly in case of fire 
on or near the reservation. Fortunately, although the season 
was very dry, the reservation escaped destructive fires. The 
superintendent looked out for trespassers, and made a list 
of abutters. He also marked anew the old survey, made by 
the county commissioners in 1899, for a proposed road, hav- ^ 
ing maximum grades of 7 and 8 per cent., from " the lower 
divide " (at a point about iVz miles down the southerly road) 
to the Scholz house, southeasterly from the summit, where 
it strikes the highway at a point about 2 miles from Adams. 
It trends southerly along the easterly mountain side, and 
thence by loops to the highway. The distance on the sur- 
vey is about 4% miles. With the present highway leading 
from Adams, the grades on which might be greatly improved, 
a road built over it, connecting with the roads already built 



4 



GREYLOCK COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



above, would make the distance from Adams to the summit 
about S miles. This would be the shortest carriage drive to 
the summit from any of the surrounding valleys. From 
Pittsfield to the summit the distance by roads is about 17 
miles; from AVilliamstown by the North Adams road, about 
12 miles; from North Adams, about 9 miles. The Pittsfield 
road, though far longer, has now by far the easier grades, 
and the drive from that point takes less time than the others. 
Nearly all the mone}^ thus far expended for approaches to 
the reservation, since it was established, has been upon the 
southern or Pittsfield route, although eventually the upper 
portion of the road to the south can be used by all the towns, 
— • that is, the % of a mile near the top. 

The iron observation tower on the summit has been thor- 
oughly repainted. A new bridge has been built over Mitchell 
Brook, and 500 feet of new road made just north of the 
brook. 

By the Acts of 1906, chapter 419, the county commission- 
ers of Berkshire were authorized to lay out, construct and 
maintain an approach from the south, from the Northrup 
road in Lanesborough up over the ridge, about 5% miles, to 
a point near Mitchell Brook, about % of a mile of which w^as 
within the reservation. In the fall of 1906 the county com- 
missioners did some work on this road within the reservation 
limits, and during the year 1907 the road was practically 
completed ; the only remaining work to be done is the build- 
ing of one or two cattle passes, the draining and stoning of 
certain places where the road over the hills leads through 
pockets, and the widening of an arch bridge, etc., the esti- 
mated expenses being about $500. The road was opened, 
however, for driving in the fall of 1907. Mr. George A. 
Bauer, the superintendent of the reservation, built the road 
for the county commissioners. This road runs through six 
farms, passing Round's Rock, a fine view point, and through- 
out its entire distance affords unsurpassed views of Berkshire 
hills and valleys lying to the south and west of the reserva- 
tion. Its cost thus far to the county, including land damagesJ 
is $6,152.18. 

Under the direction of Mr. Sperry, of the Greylock Reser- 



1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 67. 



5 



vation Commission, a way was built, for about % of a mile, 
from a point on the new county way -near the site of the old 
Bennett house, over a right of way owned by the State on 
the Milton farm, which greatly benefits the approach to the 
reservation from the Cheshire valley. 

A road was begun from " the Camping Ground (on the 
westerly side of the mountain south of ''the Hopper") ex- 
tending up to the old temporary or Cooke and Eobbins road, 
and thence up to the high bridge on the main road up the 
mountain from the south. The upper part has as yet only 
had the trees and brush removed from the proposed travelled 
path, but it is hoped to complete this next season. The com- 
mission design hereafter to extend this road about 1 mile, 
running westerly from the " Camping Ground," and thence 
northerly up on to " Stony Ledge," where the best view of 
" the Hopper " is obtained. Eventually a road may lead 
from that point down through " the Hopper," leading toward 
Williamstown. 

The usual repair on all the roads was attended to through- 
out the season, and they were in excellent condition. 

With the new approach from the south, a road over the 
hills and through the reservation from south to north now 
extends for a distance of about 15 miles, — that is, from the 
NTorthrup road in Lanesborough to the N^otch Reservoir in 
North Adams. The portion from the summit north, nearly 
6 miles, was built before the reservation was established, 
and was given to the State ; the 9 miles to the south has been 
built since by the county of Berkshire. The completed dis- 
tance furnishes as beautiful a mountain drive as the State 
affords. 

Statements issued by the county commissioners show that 
thus far the county has appropriated for care and mainte- 
nance of the reservation the sum of $10,862.25, beginning 
with the year 1900; and that the county has in addition ex- 
pended on roads from the summit down to the Rockwell road 
(about miles) the sum of $17,428.84, which included 
the cost of the survey of the proposed Adams road in 1899 ; 
for temporary roads, $783.55 ; for the Rockwell road, author- 
ized by the statute of 1906, 5% miles in length, which con- 



6 



GREYLOCK COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



stitutes the soutlieni approach to the reservation, the sum of 
$6,152.18 ; and upon the North Adams road, in repairs, etc., 
the sum of $315 ; making a total of county expenditures for 
care, maintenance and roads since the reservation was estab- 
lished in 1898 of $35,541.82. To this total is to be added 
the cost of a stone crusher recently purchased by the county 
for use on the resen-ation. 

These mountain roads are not built for automobile travel. 
They are too narrow as yet in many places. There should be 
yet more turnouts and sluices, and the grades on the North 
Adams road could be much improved. 

The commission has in view a road from a point south 
of the rounded summit of Greylock, about % of a mile in 
length, skirting the western side of the peak, to connect the 
road running south from the summit with the North Adams 
road. This would do away with the steep ascent on the north 
side of the peak, and would give the people driving from the 
north grand glimpses of the mountain scenery to the south, 
replacing an average 15 per cent, grade with one on the new 
portion of about 3 per cent. 

The dome of Greylock greatly needs attention, and as soon 
as may be the commission hope to add to its attractiveness 
and convenient use in various ways. 

There is yet to be located one of the rights of way owned 
by the State over the Milton farm, leading northeasterly from 
the Cummings' house to the EoUett lot. There is a wood 
road through the FoUett lot, leading northerly, which will 
connect with the proposed Adams road, thus opening up the 
southeasterly portion of the reservation, perhaps 1,000 acres, 
lying easterly of Saddle Ball. 

The commission has had prepared by Mr. Arthur W. Saf- 
ford, the register of deeds at Adams, a typewritten book con- 
taining minutes, references and descriptions of the deeds 
obtained by the State of land already acquired for the reser- 
vation, which will be of great value in the work of the com- 
mission. 

In 1906, by chapter 448 of the Acts of that year, the Legis- 
lature appropriated $30,000 for the purchase of additional 



1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 67. 



7 



land for the reservation, the last $10,000 of which was to be 
available for the year 1908. The commission has already 
purchased from that fund about 445 acres known as the Wal- 
den purchase, 74 acres from William Collins and about 10 
acres on the westerly line of the reservation. Surveys and 
descriptions have been made and prepared to aid in the pur- 
chase or taking of other lands needed to complete the present 
plan. Estimates are being made for land values, and nego- 
tiations are under way for the purchase or preliminary to the 
taking of the lands. 

Boundary Maukeks for the RESERVATioisr. 

The commission find, on consultation with Mr. John H. 
Emigh of North Adams, civil engineer and surveyor, that 
about 96 markers will be needed to define the outside lines 
of the reservation. Eifty of these have already been obtained, 
and under great difficulties drawn to the points where they 
are to be set up; 46 others will be needed, and will be ob- 
tained and placed when funds are provided for that purpose. 
The 50 already obtained reached N'orth Adams on May 27, 
1907. These markers are not less than 7 feet long, and the 
part to be exposed above the ground is about 2/4 feet. The 
average weight is about 650 pounds. Where they are to be 
placed on side lines the letters G. R. (Greylock Reservation) 
will show on one face. At the angle points of the reservation 
lines the G. will be on one face and R. on the adjacent face. 
The markers will be placed so that the letters will appear on 
the side toward the reservation. Their great weight made 
the work of transporting them to the points where they are 
to be set up a difficult undertaking. The 50 already drawn to 
points where they art to be set up are on the south, east and 
north sides of the reservation. They will not be placed at uni- 
form distances, but will be placed at all angle points ; and in 
long stretches between the angles will be placed in prominent 
places at intervals of from 1,000 feet to V2 mile. After 
being set there will be a groove cut across the top of the 
marker, thus indicating the direction of the reservation line. 

The design is, after these markers are placed, to cut a path- 



8 



GREYLOCK COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



wav or trail through the forest from one marker to the next, 
so that private owners abutting on the reservation can easily 
find the boundary lines. At some time the pathway should 
be made wide enough to furnish some protection against fire 
in certain places. 

The commission regrets that these markers are not now all 
ordered and set up, and the delay is caused solely from lack 
of a proper appropriation for that purpose. The funds thus 
far used in the work, about $520, have come from the small 
balance of the $14,000 appropriation of 1904, which was 
saved from the estimates for the purchase of lands. The 
commission deems it wise to ask from the Legislature a small 
appropriation to complete this work. The legislative com- 
mittees who have made reports favoring appropriations for 
the purchase of lands have always felt and suggested that the 
State should protect its own interests by clearly defining the 
boundaries of the reservation; but the acts granting appro- 
priations have been for the purchase of lands, and hitherto 
have not expressly made it clear that the lands purchased 
should be properly marked with boundary stones. The com- 
mission has hitherto felt that it would be more economical 
for the State to await the purchase of the complete territory 
needed for the reservation before placing these outside bound- 
ary markers. 'Now that we know where the outside lines will 
be located, the need is urgent in order to protect the State's 
interest in the lands. 

The estimated cost of purchasing, hauling and setting up 
the 46 remaining boundary stones, and setting up those al- 
ready upon the ground, will be about $1,200. This sum will 
include the proper supervision of the surveyor, and all items 
of expense in the matter. Owing to the character of the land 
where the boundary lines run, the commission deems it of the 
utmost importance that these markers should be set. If these 
are not set during the coming season, the angle points must 
be gone over and stakes renewed, or many will be lost, the 
original surveys having been made four and five years ago. 

Cutting out the line bounding the reservation, which may 
also be considered a part of the permanent marking, would 
cost about $500. 



1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 67. 



9 



A resolve might be introduced in the Legislature this year 
appropriating the sum of $1,200 for procuring the balance 
of the markers needed and placing them, etc., and the further 
sum of $500 for cutting out the boundary lines. 

JOHNT BASCOM, 
LEANCIS W. ROCKWELL, 
WILLIAM H. SPERRY, 

Commissioners. 



Dec. 31, 1907. 



Public Document No. 67 



EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 

GREYLOCK COMMISSION. 



JANU ARY;. •i9D9 




BOSTON: 

WEIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1909. 



Public Document 



No. 67 



EIGHTH A>^NrAL REPORT 



GEEYLOCK COMMISSIOX 



JANUARY. 1909. 




BOSTON: 

WEIGHT * POTTEE PRTSTCsG CO^ STATE FBINTESS, 
IS Post Otficb Square. 
1909. 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 



7/IM3 



REPORT OF THE GREYLOCK COMMISSION. 



The Greylock reservation was established in June, 1898. 
The first season and the following one were occupied in 
securing the money required for the purchase of the prop- 
erty held bv the Greylock Park Association ; this purchase 
being the condition of the first grant from the State. Xow, 
at the close of the eighth 3'ear of active work, the reserva- 
tion embraces 8,187 acres, and contains all, or nearly all, 
the land desired for its completion. It extends north and 
south 6 miles, and east and west, in its extreme points, 43^^ 
miles. The outline is irregular, corresponding to the 
structure of the mountains, and also somewhat governed by 
the needs of adjoining farms. A large tract, 436i/'2 acres, 
held by Dewey Phillips, has been acquired during the present 
year by condemnation ; also a tract, 300 acres, situated in 
the " Hopper " and owned by Clarence Smith. X small tract 
owned by Burt Eldridge has been obtained by purchase. 
These parcels were enclosed in the reservation. It may be 
deemed advisable to rectify the boundaries at a few points, but 
the work of piurchase is essentially complete. Land owned 
by the city of Xorth Adams in connection with its water 
works is regarded as an extension, in its practical bearings, 
of the reservation. The boundaries of these adjoining prop- 
erties have been amicably arranged. 

About half of the sfranite markers definino^ the reservation 
have been placed, and this work is passing to completion. 
The immediate work of the State is, therefore, according to 
present appearances, nearly accomplished. 



4 



GREYLOCK COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



The county of Berkshire has appropriated annually $1,500 
for the support of tlie reservation, expended a large sum, as 
given in previous reports of the commission, and $2,500 
during the present year. There have been no stint and no 
reluctance on the part of the county in the aid it has fur- 
nished to the reservation. 

Up to the present time the Greylock Commission has 
been chiefly occupied in the construction of roads. The 
success of this work has been very considerable. There was 
but one road, and that in a bad condition, extending from 
the summit northward, when the commission entered on its 
duties. This road has been put in a fair condition, but still 
calls for considerable labor in reducing its grades and in 
improving the road bed. The road from the summit south 
has been constructed with an easy grade, and commands 
many fine views. About 3 miles from the summit it divides, 
the right-hand branch dropping down the slope more rapidly, 
and furnishing an approach to New Ashford, as well as to 
Lanesborough and Pittsfield. The left-hand branch follows 
the ridge, as it gradually declines to the south, and fur- 
nishes for a long distance a magnificent view of the moun- 
tains, lakes and central valley of the county. It also opens 
up a road to Cheshire. There remains in roadmaking the 
uniting the summit, on the one side, with Adams, and, on 
the other, with. Williamstown through the " Hopper," the 
natural portal of the range. During the past summer a road 
has been finished uniting the camping ground with the sum- 
mit ; and also one extending west from the camping ground 
to Stony Ridge, which furnishes the best view of the outer 
" Hopper," the finest single picture of the reservation. The 
camping ground lies on the line of the contemplated road 
through the "Hopper." Though the wants of Williams- 
town are the last to be met, when once this road is fittingly 
made, no road on the mountain will surpass it in its 
close association with the most striking scenery of the 
reservation. 

These various roads not only render the mountain range 
more accessible, but they are needed as fire guards. With- 
out protection of this sort it would be quite possible that 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 67. 



5 



the reservation should be swept by fire from side to side, to 
its immediate destruction. The roads should be cleared on 
either side of underwood and dead limbs, so as to offer no 
material for the spread of flames. Now that the roads are 
permanent and so far completed, much can be done, by 
cutting out views, to make the journey to the summit invit- 
ing. If a trolley is to be built, the means of access, on 
which by far the largest portion of visitors are dependent, 
will be easy and ample. The territory in the "Hopper" 
and in other portions of the reservation Avill remain in its 
native wildness, to reward those who have the energy to 
explore it. 

The summit, when the reservation was established, was 
without structures of any importance, with the exception of 
the tower. It still remains poorly* provided, and invites the 
generosity of natives of Berkshire to furnish suitable build- 
ings for the hospitable reception of its many visitors. The 
success of the reservation; provided for the extended and 
enjoyable sympathy of man with nature, will depend very 
much on the impression made by the summit. The summit 
is the center of all roads, and gives the key note of all 
pleasures. Destitution and neglect here will mar the entire 
effect. Buildings that meet all immediate wants, are in har- 
mony with the place and gratify the desire for rest, put the 
visitor at once into a mood of contentment and enjoyment. 
The grandeur is present, the day is memorable ; the more 
the pity, then, that visitors should suffer any abatement by 
surrounding conditions. 

The commissioners have looked hitherto neither to the 
State nor to the county to jprovide the hospitable entertain- 
ment of strangers. As the expense of suitable buildings 
will not be great nor frequently renewed, they still cherish 
the hope that the goodwill of the northern and middle por- 
tion of the county will suffice for this work, and complete 
the reservation by a provision which more than any other 
will express the large and genial temper which should go 
with it. 

An urgent necessity on the summit is an adequate supply 
of water. During the last weeks of the present season it 



6 GREYLOCK COMMISSION. [Jan. 

has been necessaiy to draw it from a distance. Both health 
and comfort demand water in greater abundance. It would 
be quite possible, with buildings of reasonable dimensions, 
to catch sufficient water for the year's supply. In the 
absence of such buildings, it must be drawn to the summit, 
and will be scrimpinglj used. This laborious and ineffectual 
method ought to be replaced with one more proportioned to 
the circumstances. If we are not to have buildings, the 
needed water should be pumped from the nearest suitable 
spring. 

The reservation is almost wholly covered with forest, a 
considerable portion of it primitive. To bring this forest 
into its most productive and at the same time most beautiful 
form will tax for many years the utmost skill of the com- 
missioners. All that the present Board can hope to do is to 
commence the labor, and leave it in a suitable form to be 
completed by those who are to follow. At present there 
is much undergrowth of no significance, many dead and 
decaying trees, and trees which have long since become 
tough and crabbed by old age. There is thus in the 
forest much to be removed and much to be encouraged 
by better conditions of growth. The expression of neglect 
and injur}'- should be displaced by that of watchful, wise 
and interested care. The forest would thus at all times 
show the largest growth, be made up of trees in every stage 
of development, and look each year to the removal of 
those which were completing their service. The aggregate 
growth Avould thus be the greatest possible, the vigor the 
most general and the sense of life the most comprehensive. 
The yearly removal for wood and lumber should take place 
with the least disturbance and the most benefit. Some of 
the European forests have come to yield an annual income 
of $6 an acre. In the beginning this renovation of the 
forest should take place along the roads, extending farther 
out, as experience should indicate. At present this process 
brings little or no return. ^Ve are doing, without reward, 
w^ork that should have been done j^ears ago. As, however, 
the labor advances, it will gain in ease and profit, and in the 
end we shall be found cutting the best and the most valuable 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 67. 



timber, not the poorest. This is winter work, and in time 
the production of the winter might help the expenditure of 
the summer. AVe are to bear in mind that the utilitj' of the 
reservation is primarily spiritual, not physical ; but the 
highest purpose is alwaj^s best attained with some wise ref- 
erence to lower objects. There will always remain in the 
reservation large areas in which the freedom and boldness of 
nature will constitute the primary impression, and render 
the chief service. 

The reservation ought to become, and we trust is destined 
to become, the shelter and home for many beautiful things, 
both in the vegetable and the animal kingdom. This should 
be its distinguishing characteristic. The moment one enters 
its borders, he should be struck with the number of livinof 
things which are cared for and made to yield their full return 
to the delighted eye and instructed mind. This sympathy 
of nature with man and appreciation of nature by man should 
be the chief reward of the labor bestowed on the reservation . 
It is for this that the mountains and their slopes are reserved 
as a most significant part of our heritage. So will the reser- 
vation become, in the midst of our industries, an unfailing 
token of the l)eauty of the world granted to us, of the favor 
(»f God in his hourly work in our behalf. 

JOHX BASCO^^I, 

FRANCIS ^y. ROCKWELL, 

WILLIAM H. SPERRY, 

Commissio7ier.'i. 



Public Document 



No. 67 



NINTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

GREYLOCK COMMISSIO^^. 



JANUARY. 1910. 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
IS Post Office Squaee. 
1910. 



-'CO c ccc cc. 




Public Document 



No. 67 



NINTH ANNUAL REPORT 



"GREYLOCK COMMISSION 



JANUARY, 1910. 




BOSTON: 

WEIGHT & POTTER FEINTING CO., STATE PEINTEES, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1910. 



JAH 24 1910 T 

STATE HOUSE, BOST^(|loN. 



Appro\t:d by 
The State Board of Publication. 



7//M3 



®l)e aTomtnontoeaUl) of illa05acl)U0ettB. 



REPORT OF THE GREYLOCK RESERVATION 
COMMISSION. 



The Greylock reservation has been, with the close of the 
present year, in existence twelve years. Its area remains 
the same as last year, 8,187 acres. Little territory is to be 
added, and the suits in connection with two condemnations 
have left us uncertain as to the sum still at our disposal. The 
primitive forest, the second growth and the cleared spaces 
are being rapidly united in one inviting prospect. 

What was our first labor still remains a primary consid- 
eration, suitable roads. There are about twelve miles of 
road in the reservation, and a half dozen or more, outside 
its bounds but wholly associated with it. Much has been 
done to these roads to make the grades light and the road- 
bed firm. The road from ^orth Adams, about five miles of 
which lies in the reservation, was the first to be established, 
and still requires some improvement. We are just begin- 
ning to use crushed stone, and we hope shortly to be rid of 
muck. 

The main road south to Pittsfield throug-h Lanesborouo^h 
is of light grade and in good condition. About two miles 
from the summit there is a branch road of a mile and a half 
to Rocky Ledge, which affords a very fine view of the 
Hopper. A second branch road, farther on to the right, 
leads to New Ashford. Still farther on, a branch to the left 
unites with the public road to Cheshire. At about the same 
point, a second road to the left has been commenced, which 
opens up a new portion of the reservation, and which is 



4 



GREYI.OCK COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



to be extended to the public road which leads to Adams. 
This also will be a road of light grades and fine views. 
One further road is proposed through the Hopper to Wil- 
liamstown. It will be more difficult to make, but will 
render the reservation accessible from the west and open up 
some of its finest scenery. We have occasion to acknowl- 
edge the cheerful and abundant aid of the county commis- 
sioners in the building of these roads. When they are in 
good shape they will give a ready approach to the reserva- 
tion from all directions, will afford easy access to its chief 
points of interest, will furnish available fire-guards, and in 
no way, we trust, mar the bold, natural features of the 
locality. We have reason to hope that these important 
objects will all be shortly reached. 

There has been no fire in the reservation this year, and 
only one, easily managed, in its immediate vicinity. The 
superintendent has put himself in communication with 
the fire wardens of the adjoining towns and with abutters, 
thus enabling interested persons to act at once in harmony 
if occasion should arise. 

The superintendent, George A. Bauer, has shown great 
capacity in road building and in general management of the 
grounds. The results reached in this direction have been 
attained with a relatively small expenditure. 

During the year there has been some labor expended in 
preparing the ground for a new barn, 60 by 40 feet. The 
present building has been long in service, affords inadequate 
shelter, and is in every way uninviting. The new building 
should be exposed as little as possible to fire, and can advan- 
tageously be made of stone, which is abundant. These, with 
receding rustic joints, would unite durability and fitness in a 
high degree. It will occupy much the same ground as the 
old one, with a larger yard. 

The direction in which the labors of the commission have 
been hitherto least satisfactory has been the buildings on 
the summit. These have been mere makeshifts, utterly out 
of keeping with the wants of visitors, the services which 
those in charge would be glad to render, the hospitality of 
the reservation, and the impression which surrounding 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 67. 



5 



objects are fitted to give. There ought to be nothing on 
the summit to mar or weaken the force and pleasure of 
magnificent scenery. We have always been exposed, 
especially in the winter months, to injury and rudeness. 
Our own shortcomings provoke this disrespect. When 
our action is in harmony with nature, and modestly avails 
itself of the opportunities of the place, we can hope that all 
unseemly human action will disappear. It is not at all the 
purpose of the commission to furnish entertainment to those 
indifferent to the regal beauties of the world, but simply to 
give, for a brief period, the means necessary to the quiet 
enjoyment of nature. This is the more needful as no other 
aid is at hand, severe storms are liable to arise, and the 
morning and evening hours are wont to be much the finest. 
In the division of labor the purchase of the land fell to the 
State, the expense of " care and maintenance" was laid on 
the county, thus leaving a suitable provision on the summit 
to the interest and libei-ality of citizens. This is a fitting 
partnership of the entire community in an undertaking 
whose success must depend on the universality of the inter- 
est it awakens. This interest, once aroused and suitably 
expressed, will make of the reservation that magnificent 
accumulation of natural gifts and human responsiveness 
which it was intended to be. We love to adorn our cities 
and villages, to enrich them w^ith libraries and museums. 
In the reservation, the wider and grander provisions of the 
outer world are to be offered to all citizens and all comers 
on the same free terms with which they are bestowed. 

The estimated number of visitors for the past jesiv is 
fourteen thousand and this, in each case, means one day at 
least given to awakening a deeper sympathy with the world 
in which we are. It seems at once pitiful and contemptible 
to urge large expenditure in behalf of the reservation, and 
then to leave this expenditure in part to fail because of 
mean appliances and inadequate accessories. When the 
primary purposes and the method of their fulfilment shall 
fully concur in the relaxation, pleasure and instruction of 
the entire community, we shall come to understand what a 
great and fitting undertaking the reservation really is. 



6 



GREYLOCK COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



One most important interest involved in the labor at the 
smiimit is the water supply. This has been insufficient and 
often of a poor quality. The springs are several hundred 
feet below the summit, and not very copious. They 
promise neither a ready nor an ample amount of water. If 
capacious reservoirs were cut out of the rock in connection 
with each of the large buildings, and filled from roofs which 
did not stain the rainfall, a large supply of the purest water 
could be secured. Even now when these conditions are by 
no means met, most of the water that is used comes from 
above. The new barn will be provided with a large rock 
reservoir. 

The time ought not to ])e far off when the reservation 
would be in occupation during the entire year. There is 
now enough wood and timber waiting to be cut to meet all 
or nearly all the expense involved in the labor of winter. 
Nor, if suitable buildings were open, would there be in any 
month of the year an entire absence of visitors. To bring 
the reservation to its highest usefulness in all directions is 
an undertaking calling for much skill and economy. AYe 
can hardly think that the inhabitants of Berkshire would 
have asked so large a gift from the public unless they were 
fully ready to make it successful by their own liberal 
co-operation. The reservation will be a great ornament and 
lasting praise to Berkshire, if it is handled in the spirit in 
which it was given. We are under the more obligation to 
remember this when the southern portion of the county is 
striving to convert High Peak into a second reservation. 
This effort we should aid, and at the same time we should 
feel the generous emulation it lays upon us. The county 
gave us the past year 82,500. 

There have been ordered ninety-four granite markers. 
These, with the exception of two, are all on the ground, 
some in position, others as near their location as they could 
be carried by wagon. Thirty-six have been set. We have 
not pushed this work because of the engagements of the 
surveyor, and because we were looking to some minor 
variations of boundaries. 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 67. 



7 



In the suit between Smith and the Commonwealth the 
jury gave a verdict slightly in advance of the sum awarded 
by condemnation. The suit therefore has been without 
profit to Mr. Smith, and attended with considerable loss to 
the reservation in the item of costs. 

JOHN BASCOM, 
FRANCIS W. ROCKWELL, 
WILLIAM H, SPERRY, 

Commissioners. 



Public Document 



No. 67 



TEXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



GrREYLOCK COMMISSION. 



January, 1911. 




BOSTON: 

WEIGHT & POTTEB PEINTESTG CO., STATE PRINTEBS, 
18 Post Office Squabe. 
1911. 



One Thousand Acres within the Greylock State Reservation, overlooking the 
Hopper from the South, the Vermont Hills in the Distance. 



Public Document 



No. 67 



TENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



&REYLOCK Commission. 



JANUARY, 1911. 




STATIUBRARTOFKASSACilI]SmS, 
MAR 9 1911 

STATfe HOUSE, BOSTON. 



Approved by 

The State Board of Publication. 



A 

^l)t CommontDealth of illasaacliusctts. 



REPORT OF THE GREYLOCK RESERVATION 
COMMISSION. 



The Grej^lock State Eeservation, established by chapter 
543 of the Acts of 1898, now consists of 8,147 acres of 
wooded countrj^ broken and mountainous, lying in the 
towns of New Ashford and Williamstown, the city of North 
Adams and the towns of Adams and Cheshire. The four 
highest peaks in the State are in the reservation. 

The care and maintenance of the reservation, under the 
act of establishment, devolve upon the county of Berkshire. 
The three Greylock Reservation Commissioners are residents 
of the county of Berkshire, and are appointed by the Gov- 
ernor ; they serve without compensation. Annually they 
make an estimate of expenditures for the care and mainte- 
nance of the reservation, and, after approval by the county 
commissioners of Berkshire, this estimate is inchided by the 
Legislature in the county tax budget. Vouchers for all 
money expended by the Greylock commissioners are filed 
in the office of the treasurer of the county of Berkshire. 
Special . authority has been given the commissioners by 
statute to receive gifts for the purposes of the reservation. ' 

Accommodations on the Summit. 
Mr. Geo. A. Bauer, as in all the years since the reserva- 
tion was established, has been employed to superintend the 
work. In addition to his moderate monthly compensation 
he has been allowed the use of the little summit house and 
log stable. 'During the day the main room in the house is 
reserved for public use. The superintendent and his family 
have entertained the public, at a moderate charge for meals 
and lodging, as well as the limited accommodations have 



4 



GREYLOCK COMMISSION. [Jan. 



allowed. Since the building of the house this has been the 
arrangement. Although the accommodations are limited 
and not in keeping with the needs of the public, it has been 
thought best to continue the present plan until there are 
gifts or appropriations for the much-needed buildings, 

Eeservation Work for the Year. 
1. TFor^• of the Superintendent. 
The superintendent began his season this year b}^ making 
^;yhis annual trip around the reservation, a journey of many 
miles over country roads. He interviewed the selectmen of 
jthe various towns, the fire wardens, and the owners abutting 
the reservation ; and he engaged men to report to him by 
telephone in case of forest fires. 

After this trip he occupied the next few days in locating 
granite markers, — which had been left ' ' at the end of con- 
venient wagon haul," by order of the former surveyor, — 
working about the summit clearing up the debris of winter, 
and repairing the summit buildings. The floor of the house 
was repainted. Several small purchases were made, — two 
fire extinguishers for the house, five iron beds and mattresses, 
and screens for windows and doors. Three hundred feet of 
surface pipe was bought to connect one of the water tanks 
with the stone crusher. An inventory of all tools and per- 
sonal property was taken. 

The last week in April, when this work at the summit had 
been completed, arrangements were made for employing 
men and teams for the general work upon the reservation. 
The $15-spruce tower on Stony Ledge, destroyed by severe 
winter storms, was rebuilt. The new tower was struck by 
lightning, and was later repaired. 

JS'eed of Iron Towers. — There is but one iron tower upon 
the reservation. There should be seven others, one on each 
of the following heights : Stony Ledge, Mt. Prospect, Mt. 
Williams, Mt. Fitch, Ravenscrag, Saddle Ball and Jones 
Nose. 

Another small piece of construction work, finished later 
in the year, was the building of a concrete dam, 24 feet long 
and o feet in depth, across the outlet of the ice pond. The 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 67. 



5 



pond was partially cleared of muck, a work which should 
be continued next spring. 

Roads and Trails, — The first week in May the work of 
repairing the roads began. Not until the 14th of May did 
the superintendent's family arrive at the summit. The 
rough cutting for the outline of the trail from the Lower 
Divide to Saddle Ball, begun last year, was completed. 
About 100 yards of stone, crushed in 1909, was put on 
the County Commissioners' Road. Another 100 yards, 
crushed this year, lies on the summit near the crusher. 
A heavy storm swept the southern portion of the reservation 
in September, doing considerable damage to the roads. 
This damage was repaired partially in the fall. On the 
North Adams road certain changes which will improve the 
grades were begun ; new pieces of road will be necessary, 
one 1,300 feet in length and one 300 feet. This work should 
be continued next spring. 

A New Road built. — The most important road work of 
the year was the construction of a new road starting from 
Scholz's house southeast of the summit, near the foot of the 
Cheshire Harbor Trail. The new road extends westerly up 
the mountain for about a mile ; then it turns 2 miles in a 
southerly direction, along a plateau included in the south- 
eastern part of the reservation, east of Saddle Ball, to a 
point near the southerly end of the reservation. About 3 
miles of new road was constructed. 

This new road connects with the road built last year near 
the southerly line of the reservation. The road built last 
year leads westerly, and joins a right of way leading south- 
erly to a point near Cummings's house. There it connects 
with another right of way leading westerly to the Rockwell 
Road, the southerly approach to the mountain. 

A short portion of the road built last year was on private 
property near the southerly line of the reservation . Negotia- 
tions are under way to buy at that point 13 acres of land, to 
straighten certain lines and to include within the reservation 
the portion of the road now on private land. 

The 3 miles of road built this year is an important portion 
of the system of roads planned for the development of the 



6 



GREYLOCK COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



reservation. It makes a connecting link between the high- 
way from Adams on the east of the reservation and the roads 
which approach the summit of Grey lock frorq the south. It 
is the first road on the easterly side of the reservation. 
The distance from Adams to the summit of Greylock over 
this road is about 11% miles. Heretofore Adams people 
have been forced to travel 15 miles to reach the summit. 

By building a 2-mile piece of road northerly from the 
new road, from a point at the upper end of the Follett lot, 
to the Lower Divide, as surveyed in 1899, the distance 
from Adams to the summit might be reduced to about 
miles. Former reports have alluded to this proposed road. 
It is needed not only to shorten the distance from Adams to 
the summit, but to make it possible to reach from the summit 
the thousand acres lying in the southeast corner of the reser- 
vation. Such a road is needed, moreover, as a fire ward. 
It would help to segregate any forest fires starting on the 
east side of the reservation. 

2. Work of the Surveyor. 

The interests of the Greylock reservation sufl?ered a great 
loss in the death of Mr. John H. Emio^h of North Adams, 
on Jan. 6, 1910. Mr. Emigh was a civil engineer and was 
at one time an instructor at Kensselaer. He was painstaking 
and thorough ; and he had a detailed knowledge of the work 
of the reservation which was invaluable. 

His son, Mr. Wm. C. Emigh, C.E. (Rensselaer) , who had 
assisted in certain portions of the survey, and who had the 
advantage of his father's notes, has made this season for the 
commission a stadia survey of the Cheshire Harbor Trail 
and the 3 miles of road built this year. Tliis survey will be 
used for the purpose of mapping. 

A survey has been made as well by Mr. Emigh of the road 
and right of way built last year to the Ciunmings's house. 
He has also cut out the north side of the Paul triangle. 
^Ir. Bauer has cut out a portion of the east line of the reser- 
vation, li/'o miles, from Bassett Brook north to the upper 
Howland lot. 

The Granite Markers. — Another matter taken up by 
Mr. Emigh this year has been the placing of more of the 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 67. 



7 



granite markers on the outside lines of the reservation. 
Thirteen granite markers were set up on the northerly line. 
To locate these points it was necessary to rerun certain 
lines. Nineteen other granite markers were carried to proper 
points on the south and southwest lines of the reservation, 
and all the markers were placed firmly in position. To date 
68 markers have been set up on the outside lines of the res- 
ervation. This leaves 26 of the 94 markers purchased still 
to be placed in position. This work is very difficult, owing 
to the ledges and rough country encountered. 

3. Legal Work. 

The petition of Dewey Phillips for the assessment of dam- 
ages, by a jury, for the taking of certain land, entered in the 
Superior Court in December, 1908, was settled Oct. 4, 
1910, by the Attorney-General, without a trial. 

The petition of Clarence M. Smith, of a similar nature, 
entered February, 1909, was tried before a jury at the Octo- 
ber term, 1909, and a verdict given. From this verdict 
the petitioner appealed. Exceptions were filed Dec. 14, 
1909, which have been entered in the Supreme Court. 

Although land has been taken by the right of eminent 
domain previously, these two are the only cases which have 
reached the stage of a petition for damages. 

The right to take water from a cei-tain spring, reserved by 
Scholz in his deed to the Commonwealth, was relinquished 
by him for a small consideration, and a deed of release given 
to the Commonwealth. 

A deed of a new right of way, for a short distance, was ob- 
tained from Scholz, after a survey was made by Mr. Emigh. 
This new right of way will make the grades on that portion 
of the new road easier than those formerly encountered on 
the old right of way. 

Legislative Matters. 
The Proposed Street Hailimy to the Summit, 
Section 3 of chapter 601 of the Acts of 1910 requires the 
construction of certain street railways, by the Berkshire 
Street Railway Company before the first day of January, 



8 



GREYLOCK COMMISSION. [Jan. 



1913, upon such locations as shall be designated in the peti- 
tions of said street railwa}^ company and approved by the 
board" of railroad commissioners. 

Among the railway extensions required is — 

(6) a line of street railway from some convenient point on the line of 
the Berkshire Street Railway Company to some point at or near the 
summit of Greylock mountain : provided, that the Greylock reservation 
commission assents to the construction of such line of railway through 
the reservation and indicates a route therefor which, in the opinion o 
the board of railroad commissioners, will permit of safe and reasonabl 
economical construction and operation for a railway to some point at or 
near the summit of said mountain. 

This statute seems to indicate that if the Greylock Reserva 
tion Commission, the Berkshire Street Railway Company 
and the Board of Railroad Commissioners agree on a location 
and the Greylock Reservation Commission assents to the 
construction of the line of railway through the reservation, 
and ^'indicates a route therefor," the railway will be built, 
if, in the opinion of the Board of Railroad Commissioners, 
the route ' ' will permit of safe and reasonably economical 
construction and operation for a railway." 

As a matter of fact the Berkshire Street Railway Company 
previous to the passage of this act, caused a survey to be 
made for such a railway. From Adams the route extended 
northwesterly to the Bellows Pipe which is on the reserva- 
tion. At that point a turn was made toward the southwest 
ascending in a diagonal line the rocky, water-scarred and 
precipitous eastern face of Greylock. The present southern 
carriage road to the summit was crossed at a point just below 
the cut in the rocks overlooking Adams ; and a course was 
followed leading first toward the northwest and then swing 
ing around toward the east to the summit. Thus the ascen 
of the mountain was made by a spiral starting from the Bel 
lows Pipe and ending at the summit, — a scenic but expen 
sive route. 

The act of 1910 does not provide for any payment to th 
State from the Berkshire Street Railway Company for th 
right to enter the reservation ; nor does it specifically provide 
for the payment of a corporate franchise tax, or any other 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 67. 



9 



tax , nor does it provide that the share of the tax paid into 
the treasury of the Commonwealth by the Berkshire Street 
Railway Company, which would be appv^rtioned, under other 
provisions of the law, to the towns within which the portion 
of the railway on the reservation would lie, be apportioned 
to the Commonwealth, and credited by the Treasurer to de- 
fray the necessary expense for the care and maintenance of 
the Grey lock State Reservation, and that any excess thereof 
remaining be credited to the Greylock State Reservation 
Fund. 

See similar provisions in Acts of 1906, chapter 463, Part 
III., section 131, and Acts of 1910, chapter 592, section 4. 
The laws should be uniform in this respect. Should there 
not be an amendment to the Acts of 1906, chapter 463, Part 
III., section 131, last clause, to include the Greylock State 
Reservation in the apportionment of the tax, by inserting 
after the words ' ' AVachusett mountain state reservation com- 
mission," and before the word " shall," the words " and the 
share of the tax paid by a street railway company in respect 
to its tracks upon locations granted within the limits of the 
Greylock state reservation." 

Present Organization of the Commission. 

Prof. John Bascom, who appeared by request at the legis- 
lative hearing on the petition to establish the reservation in 
1898, and soon after was appointed on the commission, de- 
clined a reappointment in June, 1910, on the completion of 
his second term of six years. His colleagues on the commis- 
sion regret that he felt it necessary to retire. He had acted 
as chairman, secretary and treasurer, until, on the appoint- 
ment of Mr. Sperrj^, the latter was chosen secretary and 
treasurer. The gentlemen who served with Professor Bascom 
wish, in behalf of the public, to record the general apprecia- 
tion of his service. 

By a vote passed by the commission, Mr. Sperry, the 
treasurer, has supervised the work the past season. He has 
paid off the men, and, as is required, has filed with the 
Berkshire Count}" treasurer expense vouchers for all reserva- 
tion outlays. Mr. Sperry has devoted a day each week to 



10 



GREYLOCK COMMISSION. [Jan. 1911. 



making up the pay roll and paying off the men, to say 
nothing of his other duties. Tliis Avork he has done several 
years without compensation. 

The successor of Professor Bascom, appointed in July, 
1910, is Mr. Arthur B. Daniels of Adams. After this ap- 
pointment Mr. Rockwell of Pittsfield, an original member 
of the commission, was chosen chairman, Mr. Sperry of 
North Adams, treasurer, and Mr. Daniels of Adams, secre- 
tary. 

FRANCIS W. ROCKWELL, 
WILLIAM H. SPERRY, 
ARTHUR B. DANIELS, 

Commissioners. 



MAR I 2'49W.FJC